NFTE

World Series of InnovationWSI

Congratulations to Winners and Finalists in the 2021 Challenge Season!

Here are the top competitors in the 2021-22 academic year NFTE World Series of Innovation, listed by challenge category. See all the videos submitted by winners and finalists!

Bank of the West Move on Climate Challenge, SDG 13

The Challenge: Design a solution to help businesses move the needle on climate while also supporting economic growth.

Winners

First Place: eCircular, a digital application and e-waste ecosystem that incentivizes consumers to recycle their used electronics. Developed by 18-year-old Robin Ye in Singapore. See their video here.

Second Place: Rainbow Paper, a paper solution created from rice straws to solve air pollution caused by rice straw burning in Vietnam. Developed by 15-year-old Huy Phon Vu and 15-year-old Hoang Hung Vo, students at British Vietnamese International School in Hanoi, Vietnam and Vinschool Times City in Hanoi, Vietnam respectively. See their video here.

Third Place: TradiFoodMarket, an app that aims to make food markets in Taiwan more efficient by allowing vendors to connect directly with consumers. Developed by 16-year-old Cai-Xuan Lin, 16-year-old Yusin Hsiao, and 16-year-old Cheng-Yang Ho, students at Kang Chiao International School in New Taipei City, Taiwan. See their video here.

Finalists
  • Kinetic Tiles, a long-lasting flooring solution that harnesses kinetic energy in floor tiles to maximize energy efficiency. Developed by a team from Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco, California. See their video here.
  • Taste Don’t Waste, a consulting business that analyzes food wastes in businesses to minimize food waste and partner with local food banks. Developed by a team from The Chapin School in New York, NY. See their video here.
  • Savado360, converts avocado seed food waste into eco-friendly beauty products. Developed by a team from The AWTY International School in Houston, Texas and Esperanza High School in Anaheim, California. See their video here.
  • Collectask, a system of recyclable boxes with the aim of incentivizing South Korean citizens to recycle their masks more often. Developed by a team from Seoul International School in Seoul, South Korea. See their video here.
  • Hydroilet, an eco-friendly toilet solution that captures energy created from flushing through a turbine to provide efficient electricity. Developed by a team from Peak-to-Peak Charter School in Lafayette, Colorado. See their video here.
  • Compost2U, a composting business that focuses on making composting accessible to the local community in San Jose, California by educating community leaders and distributing compost bins Developed by a team from Independence High School in San Jose, California.

Citi Foundation Inclusive Growth Challenge, SDG 8

The Challenge: Design a solution to build a more just society by closing the racial wealth gap and promoting equity through inclusive economic opportunity.

Winners

First Place: Luminous Teen, a teenage freelancing platform where teenagers with passion and talents can get connected with a market that needs their services. Submitted by 18-year-old Nasif Iqbal, 18-year-old Sabrina Tasnim, and 18-year-old Aumio Sarker, and 14-year-old Ahnaf Ilman, students at Notre Dame College in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Sabujbagh Government College in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Wordbridge School in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and Dhaka Residential Model College in Dhaka Bangladesh respectively. See their video here.

Second Place: Seattle Trims, a nonprofit dedicated to providing complimentary haircuts and resume preparation to unemployed individuals in the Seattle area. Developed by 18-year-old Cameron Sandoval, 16-year-old Michelle Wu, 18-year-old Meghan Reiner, and 17-year-old Kevin Shao. Students at Mercer Island High School in Mercer Island Washington, Arcadia High School in Arcadia, California, Jserra Catholic High School in San Juan Capistrano, California, and Mountain View High School in Mountain View, California respectively. See their video here.

Third Place: Education$Go, a website that provides personalized scholarship opportunities to under resourced students through connections with existing school district student portals. Developed by 16-year-old Angelina Lezcano, student at Coral Gables Senior High School in Coral Gables, Florida. See their video here.

Finalists
  • Resume Your Way, nonprofit website that provides resources and professional resumé writing support for young Black professionals. Developed by a team from Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco, California. See their video here.   
  • Fi.Ho., an online platform that aids South Korean migrants find housing and employment. Developed by a team from Branksome Hall Asia in Seogwipo, South Korea. See their video here.
  • Quacking the Case, a tutoring app designed to enable peer-to-peer support for students in underprivileged communities. Developed by a team from Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California. See their video here.
  • Little Sunshine Daycare, an affordable daycare with extended hours to help families decrease childcare costs. Developed by a team from Mounds View High School in Arden Hills, Minnesota. See their video here.
  • Diversifyin’ Out, a yearlong free afterschool mentorship program for high school POC and undocumented students. Developed by a team from Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco, California. See their video here.
  • League Anatomy, a community-based selling platform to increase access to affordable sporting equipment. Developed by a team from San Leandro High School in San Leandro, California.
  • Supplementary Education, a nonprofit organization with a goal of providing disadvantaged Black American high school students with the opportunity to reach their full academic potential. Submitted by a team from Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco, California

EY Collaborate for Impact Challenge, SDG 17

The Challenge: Design a solution to help secure a livable future by promoting collaborative action on sustainability by business, government, and civil society.

Winners

First Place: MVMNT, an app that partners eco-conscious consumers with local green businesses and activism networks to foster sustainable lifestyles. Developed by 16-year-old Jason Lin and 16-year-old Daniel Shi, students at Cranbrook Kingswood School in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. See their video here.

Second Place: AUesome, a social enterprise that aims to improve access to therapy for neurodiverse children by creating specialized kits and app-based support. Developed by 16-year-old Anshul Gupta, 17-year-old Isabella He, and 18-year-old Andrew Kim, students at Archbishop Mitty High School in San Jose, California, Mission San Jose High School in Fremont California, and University of Southern California in Los Angeles, California respectively. See their video here.

Third Place: DIGS, a blockchain-based smart grid that aims to increase electric efficiency and drive the transition to renewable energy. Developed by 17-year-old Evan Tok, student at Catholic High School PJ in Selangor, Malaysia. See their video here.

Finalists
  • Affinity Tree, a hub for nonprofits to connect on a global level. Developed by a team from Mission San Jose High School in San Jose, California. See their video here.
  • Education Empowered, a virtual platform that connects students from under-resourced backgrounds with mentors. Developed by a team from Boston Latin School in Boston, Massachusetts. See their video here.
  • OmniMed, a decentralized storage system of used medication for distribution in underprivileged communities. Developed by a team from Cantonment Public School and College, Dhaka Residential Model College, and St. Joseph Higher Secondary School in Bangladesh. See their video here.
  • Project S.O.S., utilizes AI systems to develop shipping routes to increase transportation effectiveness and reduce oil spills. Developed by a team from Kang Chiao International School in New Taipei City, Taiwan. See their video here.
  • Saven, a purpose-driven cryptocurrency based on offering incentives for environmentally conscious actions. Developed by a team from Montclair Kimberly Academy in Montclair, New Jersey. See their video here.
  • Sahay, a collaborative hospital project that allows hospitals to share resources and oversee inventory. Developed by a team from Delhi Public School and Srishti Manipal Institute of Art, Design, and Technology in India. See their video here.
  • The Mentorship Pledge, creates partnerships between private-sector corporations and public housing projects that aims to match teens in housing projects with corporate mentors. Developed by a team in New Jersey. See their video here.

Mary Kay Gender Equality Challenge, SDG 5

The Challenge: Design a solution to promote workplace equality and equal access to economic opportunity for women and girls.

Winners

First Place: STEMinists, an online portal that connects female professionals to mentor young female STEM students to bolster female success in STEM fields. Developed by 15-year-old Misaki Nguyen, student at Silver Creek High School in San Jose, California. See their video here.

Second Place: Pads for Peace, a feminine product subscription box that donates a box to homeless shelters for every box purchased. Developed by 14-year-old Ashley Cohen, 14-year-old Olivia Mooney, and 14-year-old Ashley Simonian, students at Brentwood School in Los Angeles, California. See their video here.

Third Place: Black Girls Mean Business a virtual summer business program for black high school girls that matches young professionals with mentors from industry leading businesses.  Developed by 17-year-old Brianna Holmes, 18-year-old Cherry Zhang, 17-year-old Alyssa Torres, and 17-year-old Rachel Holmes, students at Silver Creek High School in San Jose, California. See their video here.

Finalists
  • Intern for a Day, a social networking service for professional women to offer mentoring services. Developed by a team from Durant High School in Plant City, Florida. See their video here.
  • Rate My Workplace, a website that provides workplace reviews along with gender composition profiles of companies to identify inclusive workplaces. Developed by a team from Delhi Public School in Dwarka, India. See their video here.
  • Prowess, a returnship (an internship that helps adults who have taken time away from their careers and are interested in re-entering the workforce) platform to match women to employers. Developed by a team from William Mason High School in Mason, Ohio. See their video here.  
  • We Are Stronger Together, an awareness campaign and advocacy group that seeks to improve the health and well-being of South African women by providing education and easy access to feminine products. Developed by a team from Brentwood School in Los Angeles, California. See their video here.
  • CheckQuo, a hiring app that that hides applicant gender during screening to standardize hiring practices. Developed by a team from Hayward High School in Hayward, California.
  • Within Reach, a company playroom that allows workers with children to have access to childcare during working hours. Developed by a team from Abraham Lincoln High School in Los Angeles, California.

Maxar Community Resilience from Space Challenge, SDG 11

The Challenge: Design a solution using satellite imagery and other geospatial data to help communities become more inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable.

Winners

First Place: Eagle Eye, harnesses geospatial data to aid in waste management of urban areas. Developed by 18-year-old Robin Ye and 18-year-old Bryan Ng from Singapore. See their video here.

Second Place: GeoSat, uses SMAP satellite data to predict potential landslides in Taiwan to increase alerts and evacuation efficiency. Developed by 16-year-old Pan Yung-Shian and 16-year-old Casper Liao, students at Kang Chiao International School in Taiwan.  See their video here.

Third Place: Wild Ping, an immersive map that combines various interfaces to display relevant information to inform fellow wilderness explorers. Developed by 18-year-old Spencer Jordan and 17-year-old Thomas Brasch, students at Mead High School in Spokane, Washington. See their video here.

Finalists
  • COV-APP, an app using geospatial data to track the spread of coronavirus to develop more accurate contact-tracing. Developed by a team from American Academy of Nicosia in Nicosia, Cyprus. See their video here.
  • AmoryGuard, pairs wearable tech sensors with online consultations to increase access to health monitoring. Developed by a team from Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts. See their video here.
  • GeoConnect, utilizes geospatial data to increase access to high-speed internet in Native American reservations. Developed by a team from Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco, California. See their video here.
  • Satellites for a Better Tomorrow, collects soil moisture data to aid farmers and ranchers improve farming efficiency. Developed by a team from Diamond Technology Institute in Watsonville, California. See their video here.
  • Interseller, collects geospatial data to detect areas at risk of natural disasters and identify patterns in natural disasters. Developed by a team from Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California. See their video here.
  • Refugenie, utilizes GIS data to optimize safe and effective routes for refugee resettlement during environmental catastrophes. Developed by a team from Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California. See their video here.
  • Blaze Watch, an emergency navigation system used to safely guide people at risk of wildfires. Developed by a team from Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California.

PIMCO Food Equity Challenge, SDG 2

The Challenge: Design a solution to address disparities (racial or other) in access, to help ensure that all people, at all times, have enough nutritious food and other resources to live healthy, active lives.

Winners

First Place: Verdant City, a three-tiered city-wide project that aims to reduce produce distance by connecting local schools to produce. Developed by 16-year-old Redding Baldwin, 16-year-old Taj Melhuish, and 17-year-old Jack McCuddin, students at Episcopal School of Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California. See their video here.

Second Place: Grains for Migrants, a mobile app geared towards establishing partnerships between wholesale producers and migrants to address the lack of access to quality foods to underserved migrant communities. Developed by 18-year-old Jiaheng Yin and 17-year-old Justin Cheong, students at Hwa Chong Institution in Singapore. See their video here.

Third Place: Last Call,a mobile app that serves as a directory to allow low-income families access to affordable groceries in Santa Clara County. Developed by 17-year-old Charlise Lardizabal and 17-year-old Lara Bella, students at Independence High School in San Jose, California. See their video here.

Finalists
  • Buddy’s Bug Burger, a bug-based burger alternative made from a Panamanian family recipe to reduce the cost of food production for farmers and consumers. Developed by a team from Coral Reef Senior High School in Miami, Florida. See their video here.
  • Connect4Food, a food map that connects nonprofits to people in need of meals. Developed by a team from Silver Creek High School in San Jose, California. See their video here.
  • Project Oasis, distributes liquid nanoclay (LNC) in Native reservations to increase access to sustainable agriculture in otherwise barren food deserts. Developed by a team from Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco, California. See their video here.
  • Savvy Shopper, a mobile-app that helps users and grocers locate discounted grocery items and understand food expiration labels. Developed by a team from Westridge School in Pasadena, California. See their video here.
  • Young Farmers Training and Revival Organization, an initiative dedicated to training BIPOC communities to work as skilled farmers to produce organic and nutritious food on their own for profit. Developed by a team from Korea International School Jeju in Seogwipo, South Korea. See their video here.
  • Fresno Farmer’s Market, a local grocery start-up that prioritizes in-season produce in Fresno, California. Developed by a team from Silver Creek High School in Fresno, California.
  • Food Scanner, an AI-assisted camera that tracks food waste in school lunch cafeterias. Developed by a team from SMIC Private School.

Saint-Gobain Sustainable Cities Challenge, SDG 11

The Challenge: Design a solution to promote use of sustainable building materials or create a circular economy in building construction.

Winners

First Place: Cardbio, manipulates properties of cardboard to create several sustainable construction materials. Developed by 16-year-old Arnav Grover, a student at Academy of Information Technology and Engineering in Stamford, Connecticut. See their video here.

Second Place: Rubix Living, inspired by a Rubik's cube, this modular living unit serves to provide a sustainable housing solution to unhoused people. Developed by 15-year-old Renee Wang, a student at The Bishop’s School in La Jolla, California. See their video here.

Third Place: Reconcrete, leverages the limestone-forming ability of concrete to create a self-healing carbon-negative concrete solution. Developed 21-year-old Abhishek Patra, a student at the Birla Institute of Technology Mesra in India. See their video here.

Finalists
  • ECOers, a concrete solution that utilizes irradiated plastic additives to minimize plastic pollution. See their video here.
  • Respire, a 3-step demolition/construction plan that utilizes basalt fiber reinforced polymer bars and self-compacting lightweight concrete to maximize cost-efficiency while preserving a circular economy on modern construction. Developed by a team in Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California. See their video here.
  • Solar Sidewalks, a road system of interlocking hexagons made of recycled plastics to capture solar energy on roadway. Developed by a team from Mead High School in Spokane, Washington. See their video here.
  • Sustainable Vision, a processing facility proposal that partners with construction companies to foster collaboration for a circular economy. Developed by a team from Mater Dei High School in Santa Ana, California. See their video here.
  • CYR, a recycling company that specializes in construction materials and recycling education to promote sustainable construction. Developed by a team from Dakota Collegiate in Manitoba, Canada. See their video here.
  • Gypsun Inc. a gypsum recycling machine that uses renewable energy to decrease its ecological footprint. Developed by a team from Monta Vista High School in Cupertino, California.
  • Just Clean Recycled Furniture, a sustainable business that aims to use recycled construction material to create furniture and promote a circular economy. Developed by a team from Independence High School in San Jose, California.
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World Series of Innovation

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